1. First World Forum on Urban Forests

    On November 28 to December 1, 2018, the United Nations and partners in Mantova, Italy will host the first World Forum on Urban Forests (UF). This first world forum will bring together cross-sector individuals, such as national and local government, non-governmental organizations, scientists, arborists, urban planners, and architects to have a discussion and learn from one another about urban forests. This is a great opportunity for international networking and exchange expertise. There is still a lot California can learn from other countries. For instance, how we can transform our cities to become more livable and healthier, and there is a...
  2. Urban Forest Resource Roundup: Network New Year Highlights & January Learning Opportunities

    California Arbor Week is on its Way! Our poster & video contests for elementary and middle school students are now open! We’ve also published all-new lesson plans and activities for grades 3-8. Learn more here and stay tuned for more details.   Network Member Highlights A gratitude report from our friends at Canopy Some solid 2016 accomplishments at CSET Recent awards for Tree San Diego Awesome partnerships going on at Urban ReLeaf Starting off the year right with LA Conservation Corps Big changes at Common Vision! Meet us at Sacramento Tree Foundation’s Greenprint Summit Did we miss anything? Tell us...
  3. Urban Forest Resource Roundup: Trees in the News & November Learning Opportunities

    Use AmazonSmile to Support Your City’s Trees While You Shop This Season Help us keep speaking for trees at California’s Capitol! When you shop online this holiday season, use California ReLeaf’s AmazonSmile portal — it’s a little way to make a big difference for California’s trees & communities. Trees in the News Urban trees & public health in The Smithsonian Urban forests author interview in National Geographic City trees saving lives in The Washington Post California trees & drought on NPR Trees & air quality on CityLab USFS and Davey Institute’s Sustainable Urban Forest Guide The FAO’s Guidelines on Urban...
  4. Get your Tree Care Cue Cards!

    The Urban Tree Foundation has produced a series of “cue cards” with basic information related to various aspects of tree care, including: Tree Planting Tree Quality Tree Training (Pruning) Root Management Structural Pruning Restoring Topped Trees Pruning at Planting These cue cards are also available in Spanish: Plantación de Árboles (Tree Planting) Calidad del Árbol (Tree Quality) Entrenamiento del Árbol (Tree Pruning) Cuidado de las Raíces (Root Management) Restaurando Árboles Desmochados (Restoring Topped Trees) Poda Estructural (Structural Pruning) Podando al Momento De Sembrar (Prunting at Planting) You are welcome to print these cards for your own use. Each of these...
  5. From the Boston Globe: The City Is an Ecosystem

    The city is an ecosystem, pipes and all What scientists are finding when they treat the urban landscape as an evolving environment of its own By Courtney Humphries Boston Globe Correspondent November 07, 2014 Is a tree trying to survive in the city better off than a tree growing in the forest? The obvious answer would seem to be “no”: City trees face pollution, poor soil, and a root system disrupted by asphalt and pipes. But when ecologists at Boston University took core samples from trees around Eastern Massachusetts, they found a surprise: Boston street trees grow twice as fast...
  6. Silence Isn’t Golden

    Over the next month, community groups and ReLeaf Network members across California have an opportunity to comment on two important issues. They are the Department of Water Resources’ (DWR) Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (IRWM); and the California Air Resources Board’s (CARB) Urban Forest Project Protocols. To date, these efforts have been fairly non-profitable for urban forestry groups working daily to green our golden state, but with guidance from stakeholders they could prove to be beneficial.   In March, 2014, Governor Brown and the Legislature directed DWR to expedite the solicitation and award of $200 million in IRWM funding to...
  7. National Walking Day

    Today, take a break from your normal routine and take a walk.   The American Heart Association celebrates National Walking Day every year on the first Wednesday in April. The holiday was created to increase the amount of activity people get and, in turn, their heart health. Healthy urban forests are an important part of making the walks you take for heart heath even better.   People who live in tree-lined neighborhoods are three times more likely to be active than those who live in less green communities. Studies have also shown that the brain operates in a more meditative...
  8. Andy Lipkis Speaks Up About Water

    Recently, TreePeople‘s founder and Executive Director Andy Lipkis was interviewed by Transition Network about the drought occurring throughout California. In the interview, Andy talks about his past experiences that led to the foundation of one of the most influential environmental organizations in the state. He also talks about how integration between top down and bottom up measures has to happen to design creative solutions to our states water problems. Trees and green environments are a big part of that integrated design.   To read the full interview, click here.
  9. Preserving Trees Through Climate Change

    ASU researchers studying how to preserve tree species amid climate change     TEMPE, Ariz. — Two researchers at Arizona State University are aiming to help officials manage trees based on how different types are affected by climate change.   Janet Franklin, a geography professor, and Pep Serra-Diaz, a postdoctoral researcher, are using computer models to study how quickly a tree species and its habitat will be exposed to climate change. That information is used to locate areas with specific elevations and latitudes where trees could survive and repopulate.   “This is information that would hopefully be useful to foresters,...
  10. Injury Symptoms Associated with the Shot Hole Borer

    The polyphagous shot hole borer (SHB), Euwallacea sp., and Fusarium dieback, Fusarium euwallaceae, are a new insect: disease complex causing injury and mortality to numerous native and ornamental hardwood trees and shrubs in southern California. The ambrosia beetle has a wide host range and can complete development in >20 species, including avocado, Persea americana, bigleaf maple, Acer macrophyllum, California box elder, Acer negundo var. californicum, California sycamore, Platanus racemosa, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, castorbean, Ricinus communis, red willow, Salix laevigata, and white alder, Alnus rhombifolia.   U.S. Forest Service Region 5 Forest Health Protection recently created a document illustrating...