Finding New Life (And Profit) in Doomed Trees

Stuart Isett for The New York Times

Two Seattle men harvest local urban trees doomed by development, disease or storm damage, and turn them into custom furniture, each piece a distinct botanical narrative.

Their business, started four years ago, bears all the markers that would seem to point toward collapse and extinction in a recessionary economy. It’s founded on idealism and emotion. It’s riddled with huge and unavoidable inefficiencies. And it tenders a high-end product that asks buyers to take risks and have faith.

Yet the company, Meyer Wells, has thrived. To read more about how turning doomed urban trees into treasured family heirlooms has driven a successful business model, read the remainder of the article here.

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