1. Get your Tree Care Cue Cards!

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    The Urban Tree Foundation has produced a series of “cue cards” with basic information related to various aspects of tree care, including: Tree Planting Tree Quality Tree Training (Pruning) Root Management Structural Pruning Restoring Topped Trees Pruning at Planting These cue cards are also available in Spanish: Plantación de Árboles (Tree Planting) Calidad del Árbol (Tree Quality) Entrenamiento del Árbol (Tree Pruning) Cuidado de las Raíces (Root Management) Restaurando Árboles Desmochados (Restoring Topped Trees) Poda Estructural (Structural Pruning) Podando al Momento De Sembrar (Prunting at Planting) You are welcome to print these cards for your own use. Each of these cue cards is also available as a 3 ½” x 8 ½” laminated card for distribution. Printed Cards are available free of charge to dues...
  2. A Conversation with Gail Church

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    Current Position:Executive Director, Tree Musketeers What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? 1991 – present, Network group. I was on a steering committee for a National urban forest conference when I met Geni Cross and she recruited us to join the ReLeaf network. I was on the Network Advisory Council when this work dovetailed with ReLeaf’s separation from the Trust for Public Lands. I was on the committee that negotiated the move to National Tree Trust and then on to incorporating ReLeaf as a stand-alone nonprofit organization where I was a founding board member. I am still on the ReLeaf board today. What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? As a result of my extensive participation in all of the phases of ReLeaf’s life, the organization...
  3. Conversation with Rick Hawley

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    Current Position: Executive Director, Greenspace – the Cambria Land Trust What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? Network group – 1996, year before Cambria retreat. Advisory council – I was involved during the transition when advocacy became part of the Network and was one of the architects in getting ReLeaf positioned for nonprofit incorporation. What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? To me ReLeaf means that there are a lot more people out there who think about trees – it’s not just me. It’s California’s tree support network – the folks we rely on. Because of ReLeaf we know that there is tree work getting done all over the state. In every city and town there is the message that trees are important. And trees are...
  4. Conversation with Stephanie Funk

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    Current Position Fitness Instructor for Seniors What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? Staff, 1991 to 2000 – started as a temp, Program Assistant, Assistant Director PT Grant writing for TPL/Editor newsletter 2001 – 2004 PT National Tree Trust/ReLeaf team – 2004-2006 What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? Working at ReLeaf was my first real job out of college. On a personal level, this job really shaped how I currently views environmental issues. I learned about environmental awareness and about people and the world. I often felt somewhat removed from the great work of the network. The ReLeaf staff would joke about ‘never getting our hands dirty’, as in, our jobs didn’t involve actually planting trees. Our role was behind the scenes, providing resources and...
  5. Interview with Brian Kempf

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    Current Position? Director, Urban Tree Foundation What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? 1996 – Marketing the Reddy Stake to the Network 1999 started Urban Tree Foundation in Albany area with Tony Wolcott (Albany) 2000ish to present – Network member 2000 – moved Urban Tree Foundation to Visalia. What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? ReLeaf is able to provide different benefits to a diverse collection of nonprofits. Each nonprofit has their own specific set of skills and needs. For me and the Urban Tree Foundation, California ReLeaf’s primary benefit is the lobbying they accomplish. They are paying attention at the capital, day in and day out, for the network groups. They are keeping track of funding and what’s going on in Sacramento. This is a...
  6. 25th Anniversary Interviews: Andy Trotter

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    Andy Trotter Vice President of Field Operations for West Coast Arborists What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? I have been interfacing with various ReLeaf Network groups starting with an Urban Forest Management workshop at San Luis Obispo in the mid 1990’s. When I was president of California Urban Forest Council in 2007, we worked together with leadership from CaUFC, WCISA, and ReLeaf to develop the first United Voices for Healthier Communities Planting Project that involved 30 communities and members from all 3 organizations to complete one of the largest cooperative planting projects in California. What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? California ReLeaf provides an opportunity for local groups who support trees to learn from and tap into resources of a cooperative statewide umbrella. Over...
  7. Conversation with Eric Oldar

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    Current Position? CDF – State Urban & Community Forestry Coordinator (10 years) – Retired What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? Provided yearly State funding support to underwrite CA ReLeaf; funding of personnel, defining scope of work to be accomplished under the contract and providing funding for pass through grants administered by CA ReLeaf to the ReLeaf network on behalf of CDF. What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? CA ReLeaf lifted a great burden off my shoulders as State Coordinator providing for the needs of a growing network of local NGO’s focused on community tree issues; planting programs, educational outreach and networking. Best memory or event of California ReLeaf? No single event stands out, but rather the hard work and dedication of ReLeaf’s early organizational...
  8. Conversation with Martha Ozonoff

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    Current Position: Development Officer, UC Davis, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? Network member (TreeDavis): 1993 – 2000 Network Advisory member: 1996 – 2000 Executive Director: 2000 – 2010 Donor: 2010 – present ReLeaf license plate owner: 1998 – present What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? When I worked at TreeDavis, ReLeaf was my mentor organization; providing contacts, networking, connections, funding sources through which TreeDavis’s work was able to be accomplished. Pillars of the industry became my colleagues. This whole experience shaped the beginning of my career for which I have immense gratitude. Working as staff at ReLeaf took my career to a whole new different level. I learned about advocacy and working with government agencies. I went...
  9. Conversation with John Melvin

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    Current Position: State Urban Forester, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? Regional Urban Forester– 2002-06 (so, CA), 2006-09 (N CA), providing network technical support State Urban Forester – 2009 -to present, working with ReLeaf on statewide issues, managing the expectations of USFS volunteer contract. What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? California ReLeaf serves as a successful way to disseminate pertinent information on Urban Forestry through the local nonprofit organizations. ReLeaf works with stakeholders on statewide issues. And, ReLeaf, participates in state grant programs and allows small grants to become possible. Best memory or event of California ReLeaf? The evolution of California Arbor Week is one of my favorite successes of California ReLeaf. California Arbor Week has become...
  10. Interview with Elisabeth Hoskins

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    Current Position? Retired from California ReLeaf What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? Staff: 1997 – 2003, Grant Coordinator 2003 – 2007, Network Coordinator (1998 worked in Costa Mesa office with Genevieve) What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? Privilege to meet amazing people all over CA who really care about clean air, clean water, the environment in general. Amazing bunch of people who didn’t just talk about things, they did things!! They had courage; courage to write a grant application, to pursue funding, and to complete a project – even if they had never done it before. As a result, trees get planted with the help of lots of community volunteers, habitats get restored, educational tree workshops are held, etc. etc. and in the process...