1. Official Press Release: Save Our Water And Our Trees!

    Save Our Water And Our Trees! Campaign Offers Tips to Help Trees Thrive   Sacramento, CA – California ReLeaf has partnered with Save Our Water and a coalition of urban forest and other concerned organizations to raise awareness on the importance of proper tree care during this historic drought. Save Our Water is California’s official statewide conservation education program. California ReLeaf is a statewide urban forest nonprofit providing support and services to over 90 community nonprofits that plant and care for trees. With potentially millions of urban trees at risk, this campaign focuses on a simple yet urgent message: Save...
  2. From the Boston Globe: The City Is an Ecosystem

    The city is an ecosystem, pipes and all What scientists are finding when they treat the urban landscape as an evolving environment of its own By Courtney Humphries Boston Globe Correspondent November 07, 2014 Is a tree trying to survive in the city better off than a tree growing in the forest? The obvious answer would seem to be “no”: City trees face pollution, poor soil, and a root system disrupted by asphalt and pipes. But when ecologists at Boston University took core samples from trees around Eastern Massachusetts, they found a surprise: Boston street trees grow twice as fast...
  3. Setting the Stage for 2015

    by Chuck Mills   Now that CAL FIRE has received over $17 million in cap-and-trade auction proceeds to support the Urban and Community Forestry, we must all take to celebrate… for about four months.   This single victory represents a huge win for all of us, but the next battle at the State Capitol could be for the jackpot – an all-in opportunity to secure long-term funding for urban forestry.   Supplemental state budget language (commonly referred to as a trailer bill) that will be signed By Governor Brown in the coming days sets up a long-term funding strategy that...
  4. Silence Isn’t Golden

    Over the next month, community groups and ReLeaf Network members across California have an opportunity to comment on two important issues. They are the Department of Water Resources’ (DWR) Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (IRWM); and the California Air Resources Board’s (CARB) Urban Forest Project Protocols. To date, these efforts have been fairly non-profitable for urban forestry groups working daily to green our golden state, but with guidance from stakeholders they could prove to be beneficial.   In March, 2014, Governor Brown and the Legislature directed DWR to expedite the solicitation and award of $200 million in IRWM funding to...
  5. Andy Lipkis Speaks Up About Water

    Recently, TreePeople‘s founder and Executive Director Andy Lipkis was interviewed by Transition Network about the drought occurring throughout California. In the interview, Andy talks about his past experiences that led to the foundation of one of the most influential environmental organizations in the state. He also talks about how integration between top down and bottom up measures has to happen to design creative solutions to our states water problems. Trees and green environments are a big part of that integrated design.   To read the full interview, click here.
  6. Prop 84: Calling for Concept Proposals

    The State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) is now accepting Concept Proposal applications for Round 2 of the Prop 84 Stormwater Grant Program (SWGP). There will be approximately $38.4 million in funding available to local public agencies for projects that reduce or prevent stormwater contamination of rivers, lakes and streams.   General program requirements, eligibility and proposal selection details can be found in the Proposition 84 Stormwater Grant Program Guidelines. The State Water Board will hold two public workshops regarding the grant application process this month:   • Workshop 1: September 19th, 1-3 pm, Sierra Hearing Room, CalEPA...
  7. Partnering to Protect the Bay Area’s Water

    California ReLeaf recently supported the recruitment and training of two interns for The Watershed Project’s Tree Team Project who will act as Richmond Rain to Roots program ambassadors in Richmond’s Iron Triangle and Sante Fe, two low-income, high-crime neighborhoods in the city.   Training for the interns included 20 hours of basic watershed awareness curriculum that included urban forestry concepts and benefits, climate change topics, storm water pollution and an introduction to green infrastructure solutions. An additional 16 hours was spent training them for the outreach portion of the program. The interns learned how to promote the tree-planting program both...
  8. Making Urban Forestry Part of California’s Water Conversation

    Water can be a contentious issue in California’s communities. With resources becoming more limited and restrictions increasing, it’s important to make sure that urban forestry finds it’s place as one of the solutions Californians turn to to solve their water problems. Join us on Wednesday, May 15 from 11:00 a.m.-noon to hear from experts in the field and also hear case studies from an organization that has produced superior water conservation programs.   Speakers: Alf Brandt, Principle Consultant, California State Assembly Edith de Guzman, Research & Analysis Manager, TreePeople Deborah Weinstein, Director of Policy, TreePeople
  9. California Needs Urban Forests

    Ask anyone and they’ll most likely tell you they love trees. California’s cities and towns need trees, but not just to beautify the landscape. Trees do so much more!   Click on the infographic below to visit a fully interactive version on our website. The next time someone asks you, “Why trees?” you’ll have some pretty great answers.  
  10. SF Launches Sidewalk Garden Project

    Project Aims to Reduce Stormwater Impacts and Beautify Neighborhoods   WHO: The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, local non-profit organization Friends of the Urban Forest, community volunteers, with participation by District 5 Supervisor London Breed’s Office.   WHAT: Community volunteers to plant the first block-long sidewalk garden as part of a project to replace thousands of square feet of concrete sidewalk in San Francisco with thriving gardens that capture stormwater and reduce the burden on the City’s combined sewer system. Property owners in specific areas on the East side of the City may be eligible to green their neighborhood block...