1. Grants Available for Tree Planting and Tree Care Projects

    $250,000 AVAILABLE FOR TREE PLANTING AND TREE CARE PROJECTS Sacramento, CA, May 21st – California ReLeaf unveiled its new grants program today that will provide more than $250,000 to community-based groups and other organizations throughout California for urban forestry projects.  California ReLeaf’s 2012 Urban Forestry and Education Grants Program is funded through contracts with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL Fire) and Region IX of the Environmental Protection Agency.   Eligible applicants include incorporated nonprofit organizations and unincorporated community-based groups, with a financial sponsor, located in California.  Individual funding requests range from $1,000 to $10,000.  Applicants may...
  2. University of Redlands Named Tree Campus USA

    University of Redlands named Tree Campus Ed Castro, Staff Writer The Sun   REDLANDS – The University of Redlands received nationwide recognition for embracing five standards that focused on campus tree care and community involvement.   For its efforts, U of R earned Tree Campus USA recognition for the third straight year for its dedication to forestry management and environmental stewardship, according to the nonprofit Arbor Day Foundation.   The five standards included: establishment of a campus tree advisory committee; evidence of a campus tree-care plan; verification of dedicated annual expenditures on the campus tree-care plan; involvement in an Arbor...
  3. Beetle-Fungus Disease Threatens Crops and Landscape Trees in Southern California

    ScienceDaily (May 8, 2012) — A plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside has identified a fungus that has been linked to the branch dieback and general decline of several backyard avocado and landscape trees in residential neighborhoods of Los Angeles County.   The fungus is a new species of Fusarium. Scientists are working on characterizing its specific identification. It is transmitted by the Tea Shot Hole Borer (Euwallacea fornicatus), an exotic ambrosia beetle that is smaller than a sesame seed. The disease it spreads is referred to as “Fusarium dieback.”   “This beetle has also been found in...
  4. Mammoth Trees, Champs of the Ecosystem

    By DOUGLAS M. MAIN   It’s important to respect your elders, children are reminded. It seems that this goes for trees, too.   Big, old trees dominate many forests worldwide and play crucial ecological services that aren’t immediately obvious, like providing habitat for a wide range of organisms, from fungi to woodpeckers.   Among their many other invaluable roles, the oldsters also store a lot of carbon. In a research plot in California’s Yosemite National Park, big trees (those with a diameter greater than three feet at chest height) account for only 1 percent of trees but store half of...
  5. Trees Grow Faster in Urban Heat

    On an Urban Heat Island, Zippy Red Oaks By DOUGLAS M. MAIN The New York Times, April 25, 2012   Red oak seedlings in Central Park grow up to eight times faster than their cousins cultivated outside the city, probably because of the urban “heat island” effect, Columbia University researchers report. The researchers planted seedlings of the native red oak in the spring of 2007 and 2008 in four places: in northeastern Central Park, near 105th Street; in two forest plots in the suburban Hudson Valley; and near the city’s Ashokan Reservoir in the Catskill foothills about 100 miles north...
  6. Why Are Trees Taller on the West Coast?

    Climate Explains Why West Coast Trees Are Much Taller Than Those in the East By Brian Palmer, Published: April 30   Last year, a team of climbers led by arborist Will Blozan measured the tallest tree in the eastern United States: a 192-foot tulip tree in the Great Smoky Mountains. Although the achievement was significant, it served to emphasize just how puny Eastern trees are compared with the giants along the Northern California coast.   The current height champion out West is Hyperion, a 379-foot coast redwood standing somewhere in California’s Redwood National Park. (Researchers have kept the precise location...
  7. Urban ReLeaf Featured on NBC Nightly News

    One of our ReLeaf Network members, Urban ReLeaf in Oakland, was featured on the NBC Nightly News last night. Check out the great work that Kemba and Greg are doing in their city! Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy
  8. Western Growers Foundation School Garden Grants

    The Western Growers Foundation, a trade association of Arizona and California farmers who grow, pack, and ship almost half of the produce found in grocery stores across America, is offering grants of up to $1,500 for California and Arizona schools to educate students about nutrition and nature by creating their own school garden. Fruit tree plantings are eligible to receive these funds. For more information on the grant and the application, visit the Western Growers Foundation website.
  9. Why Trees Matter

    Today’s Op-Ed from the New York Times: Why Trees Matter By Jim Robbins Published: April 11, 2012   Helena, Mont.   TREES are on the front lines of our changing climate. And when the oldest trees in the world suddenly start dying, it’s time to pay attention.   North America’s ancient alpine bristlecone forests are falling victim to a voracious beetle and an Asian fungus. In Texas, a prolonged drought killed more than five million urban shade trees last year and an additional half-billion trees in parks and forests. In the Amazon, two severe droughts have killed billions more.  ...