1. Disney’s Friends for Change Spread Conservation Message

    Disney stars, Ross Lynch and Laura Marano from Disney Channel’s Austin & Ally, joined TreePeople—a nonprofit dedicated to growing a sustainable future—to connect kids with nature and create green spaces at San Pedro Elementary School in Los Angeles.   More than 100 local students and Disney VoluntEARS planted 350 trees and gardens at the school. The project was made possible through a $100,000 grant from Disney that will also be used to liven up other campuses and educate more than 20,000 students across Los Angeles about how to green their homes and communities.   As part of Disney’s commitment to protecting the planet for future...
  2. USDA Forest Service Chief Visits Oakland

    USDA Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell visited Oakland on Monday, August 20 to present a check for $181,000 to Oakland ReLeaf to support their Green Street Research, Demonstration and Education Project as well as tree planting and maintenance throughout the city of Oakland.   To see even more pictures of the event, visit California ReLeaf’s Facebook page.
  3. The Importance of Young Tree Care

    In 1995, California ReLeaf granted funds to Patrick’s Point Garden Club to plant 25 flowering cherry trees in Trinidad. Today, those trees have reached maturity thanks to the care and stewardship of the club. The care and maintenance of those trees is now being turned over to the City of Trinidad. To read more about these trees and the measures taken to make sure they thrived, read an article in the Times-Standard.   Young tree care is an important, especially in an urban setting. Proper care and pruning of young trees helps to ensure structurally sound growth and overall health....
  4. Santa Monica Registers First Urban Forest Protocol Project

    Congratulations to the City of Santa Monica and Walt Warriner Santa Monica’s Community Forester.  Their submission was accepted as the Climate Action Reserve’s (CAR) first urban forest project!  There is a tremendous opportunity to learn from Walt as the project goes through verification and begins quantifying carbon stored in trees already planted using the new Tree Carbon Calculator.   Check out our newsletter article here for more background information on this topic.
  5. Possible Cure for Sudden Oak Disease

    Marin County was ground zero for sudden oak death, so it’s only fitting that Marin is leading the way in eradicating the pathogen that causes the disease that has devastated oak forests in California and Oregon.  Scientists at the three-year-old National Ornamental Research Site at Dominican University in San Rafael unveiled breakthrough “green” technology they have developed using an ordinary commercial steamer to heat soil to 122 degrees, killing the sudden oak death pathogen.  Continue reading the article here.
  6. Budget Bill Boosts Urban Forestry Efforts

    Governor Jerry Brown has signed the primary component of the State’s 2012-2013 spending plan which seeks to close a $15.7 billion budget gap through deep cuts to multiple services, pay decreases for state workers, and reliance on the passage of a tax initiative that is slated for the November 2012 ballot.   While the 2012-13 budget is a mixed bag for multiple interests throughout California, urban forestry will see funding next year coming primarily from: $10 million included for the Environmental Enhancement and Mitigation Program, $20 million for a third and final round of urban greening grants through the Strategic...
  7. L.A. Climate Study Shows Need for Cooling Effect of Tree Canopies

    Los Angeles, CA (June 19, 2012)- The City of Los Angeles has announced findings from one of the most sophisticated regional climate studies ever produced, predicting temperatures for as far out as the years 2041 – 2060. The bottom line: it’s going to get hot.   According to Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, this research lays the groundwork for local governments, utilities, and others to prepare for climate change. This includes, according to the Mayor, “replacing incentives with building codes requiring ‘green’ and ‘cool’ roofs, cool pavements, tree canopies and parks.”   UCLA climate scientists say the number of days topping...
  8. Goldspotted Oak Borer Found in Fallbrook

    Deadly pest threatens local oak trees; infested firewood transported into other areas are of paramount concern   Thursday, May 24th, 2012 Fallbrook Bonsall Village News Andrea Verdin Staff Writer     Fallbrook’s iconic oaks might be in grave danger of infestation and destruction.   According to Jess Stoffel, vegetation manager for the County of San Diego, the goldspotted oak borer (GSOB), or agrilus coxalis, was first detected in the county in 2004 during a trap survey for invasive tree pests.   “In 2008 this borer was linked to elevated levels of oak mortality ongoing in San Diego County since 2002,”...
  9. Benicia Branches Out to Improve Air Quality

    Understanding And Valuing Benicia’s Urban Forest Jeanne Steinmann Before the gold rush in 1850, Benicia’s hills and flats made for a rather barren landscape. In 1855, humorist George H. Derby, an army Lieutenant, is reported to have liked the people of Benicia, but not the place, as it was “not yet paradise” due to the lack of trees. The dearth of trees is also well documented through old photographs and written records. Our landscape has changed dramatically with the planting of many trees over the past 160 years. In 2004, the City began taking a serious look at the care...