1. The Relationship Between Trees & Human Health

    The Relationship Between Trees and Human Health Evidence from the Spread of the Emerald Ash Borer   Background: Several recent studies have identifıed a relationship between the natural environment and improved health outcomes. However, for practical reasons, most have been observational, cross-sectional studies.   Purpose: A natural experiment, which provides stronger evidence of causality, was used to test whether a major change to the natural environment—the loss of 100 million trees to the emerald ash borer, an invasive forest pest—has influenced mortality related to cardiovascular and lower-respiratory diseases.   Click the link above to read the results and the full...
  2. US Forest Service Report Forecasts Next 50 Years

    WASHINGTON, Dec. 18, 2012 —A comprehensive U.S. Forest Service report released today examines the ways expanding populations, increased urbanization, and changing land-use patterns could profoundly impact natural resources, including water supplies, nationwide during the next 50 years. Significantly, the study shows the potential for significant loss of privately-owned forests to development and fragmentation, which could substantially reduce benefits from forests that the public now enjoys including clean water, wildlife habitat, forest products and others. “We should all be concerned by the projected decline in our nation’s forests and the corresponding loss of the many critical services they provide such as...
  3. New Online Tool Estimates Carbon and Energy Impact of Trees

    DAVIS, Calif.— A tree is more than just a landscape design feature. Planting trees on your property can lower energy costs and increase carbon storage, reducing your carbon footprint. A new online tool developed by the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE)’s Urban and Community Forestry Program, and EcoLayers can help residential property owners estimate these tangible benefits.   Using a Google Maps interface, ecoSmart Landscapes (www.ecosmartlandscapes.org) allows homeowners to identify existing trees on their property or select where to place new planned trees; estimate and adjust tree growth based...
  4. The Dust Bowl – Can It Happen Again?

    This is an interesting article by Mark Hopkins at Valley Crest. He talks about the connection between native plantings, drought conditions, and the Dust Bowl. It seems the bulk of action needs to be taken by urban residents. In the 1930’s the nation’s mid-section experienced one of the worst ecological disasters in American history.  The Dust Bowl  as the period was named, was a result of destruction of native plantings, poor farming practices and an extended period of drought. My Mom was a young girl, in central Oklahoma, during this period.  She recalls the family hanging wet sheets over the windows...
  5. Field Training on the Goldspotted Oak Borer

    Announcing another hands-on training from Goldspotted Oak Borer (GSOB) researchers and specialists while in the field. Topics covered at this 3-hour training include identification of goldspotted oak borer and other insect pests; identification of oak diseases and pathogens; assessing oaks at risk and oak woodland health; Zone of Infestation, firewood best management practices and more! This event is being offered FREE of charge but registration is required.         There is considerable concern about the Goldspotted Oak Borer (GSOB), an invasive, non-native wood borer that has attacked and killed over 80,000 native oak trees in San Diego County. The information...
  6. Key to a Cool City? It’s in the Trees

    Peter Calthorpe, urban designer and author of “Urbanism in the Age of Climate Change”, has worked on some of the biggest urban design projects in the United States over the last 20 years, in places including Portland, Salt Lake City, Los Angeles and post-hurricane southern Louisiana.  He said the best thing cities can do to keep cool is plant trees.   “It’s that simple.” Calthorpe said. “Yeah, you can do white roofs and green roofs … but believe me, it’s that street canopy that makes all the difference.”   Densely vegetated areas of a city can create cool islands within an...
  7. 2013 California Arbor Week Poster Contest

    Third, fourth, and fifth grade students throughout California are invited to participate in this year’s California Arbor Week Poster Contest. This year’s contest, “The Trees in My Community Are an Urban Forest” is designed to increase knowledge of the important roles of trees and the many benefits they provide to our communities.   For lesson plans, activities, and contest rules, download our full 2013 poster contest packet.  
  8. Trees Make Good Neighbors

    National NeighborWoods™ Month is the annual celebration of trees in our communities.  Every October, tens of thousands of volunteers take action to make their communities greener and healthier by planting trees—turning their neighborhoods into vibrant, livable NeighborWoods!  To find an event or for resources to start your own, click here. National NeighborWoods™ Month is a program of Alliance for Community Trees.  Alliance for Community Trees (ACTrees) is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health and livability of cities by planting and caring for trees. With over 200 member organizations 44 states and Canada, ACTrees engages volunteers to take action...