1. California ReLeaf Is Hiring

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT CALIFORNIA ReLEAF Executive Director   California ReLeaf, based in Sacramento, California, is celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2014. With a vibrant mission to empower grassroots efforts and build strategic partnerships that preserve, protect, and enhance California’s urban and community forests, California ReLeaf is a statewide leader in promoting alliances among nonprofit and community-based groups, individuals, industries, and government agencies, encouraging each to contribute to the livability of our cities and the protection of our environment. California ReLeaf is the State’s designated Volunteer Coordinator for urban forestry in partnership with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL...
  2. Setting the Stage for 2015

    by Chuck Mills   Now that CAL FIRE has received over $17 million in cap-and-trade auction proceeds to support the Urban and Community Forestry, we must all take to celebrate… for about four months.   This single victory represents a huge win for all of us, but the next battle at the State Capitol could be for the jackpot – an all-in opportunity to secure long-term funding for urban forestry.   Supplemental state budget language (commonly referred to as a trailer bill) that will be signed By Governor Brown in the coming days sets up a long-term funding strategy that...
  3. Urban Forestry Makes History

    By Chuck Mills   On June 15, 2014, the Legislature passed a state budget bill that includes $17.8 million for CAL FIRE’s Urban and Community Forestry (U&CF) Program.  Governor Brown is expected to sign this deal.   To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single-state annual appropriation for urban forestry in US History.   More details will follow, but this much is certain: $15.7 million for projects and grants through the U&CF Program, with $2.1 million to support staffing and administration. Per the statutory requirements of Senate Bill 535, the majority of these funds will benefit disadvantaged...
  4. Preserving Trees Through Climate Change

    ASU researchers studying how to preserve tree species amid climate change     TEMPE, Ariz. — Two researchers at Arizona State University are aiming to help officials manage trees based on how different types are affected by climate change.   Janet Franklin, a geography professor, and Pep Serra-Diaz, a postdoctoral researcher, are using computer models to study how quickly a tree species and its habitat will be exposed to climate change. That information is used to locate areas with specific elevations and latitudes where trees could survive and repopulate.   “This is information that would hopefully be useful to foresters,...
  5. California Tree Advocate Teaches NPS

    Rico Montenegro, an arborist and tree advocate based in Redding, recently shared his knowledge of bringing life back to historic orchards with the National Park Service. In his interview, he speaks about work done at Whiskeytown National Historic Site, just outside of Redding. To hear the interview, download this podcast.   If you’d like to celebrate the orchard Rico talks about in his interview, you can visit Camden House during the 3rd Annual Harvest Festival tomorrow, September 21. You can find more information about the festival here.
  6. Change is Coming to Two California Communities

    Over the past few weeks, I’ve been lucky enough to work with some very dedicated people in two of California’s largest cities – San Diego and Stockton. It’s been amazing to see both what needs to be accomplished in these cities and how hard these individuals are working to make sure the work in done.   In Stockton, volunteers are facing an up-hill battle. Last year, the city declared bankruptcy. It has one of the highest homicide rates in the country. Trees are the least of this community’s worries. Yet, there is a group of citizens there who know that...
  7. Fallen Trees Drive Study

    In June, Minnesota was bombarded by storms. High winds and heavy rains meant that there were many felled trees by the end of the month. Now, University of Minnesota researchers are taking a crash course in treefall.   These researchers are scrambling to to document patterns that might reveal why some trees fell and other didn’t. They want to know if urban infrastructure – sidewalks, sewer lines, streets, and other public works projects – has effected the rate at which urban trees fall.   For an in-depth report of how this study will be conducted, you can read an article...
  8. CA Cities Run the Gamut on ParkScore

    Last year, The Trust for Public Land began rating cities throughout the nation by their parks. The index, called ParkScore, ranks the largest 50 cities in the USA based equally on three factors: park access, park size, and services and investments. Seven California cities were included in this year’s index; their rankings, anywhere from third to last, show the disparity of green space among California’s largest cities. Cities with the highest scores can receive a rating of as many as five park benches on a scale of zero to five.   San Francisco – last year’s first place winner –...
  9. A Higher Purpose

      A tree can be many things: an air filter, a playground, a shade structure, a landmark. One of the highest purposes a tree can serve, though, is as a memorial.   Recently, through support from California ReLeaf, the Incredible Edible Community Garden (IECG) was able to plant 50 trees with such a purpose.   On March 23, trees were planted at the California State San Bernardino Veteran Success Center to honor and memorialize veterans past, present, and future. The Veteran Success Center provides programs and services that are unique to the needs of service members, including a room where...
  10. California Needs Urban Forests

    Ask anyone and they’ll most likely tell you they love trees. California’s cities and towns need trees, but not just to beautify the landscape. Trees do so much more!   Click on the infographic below to visit a fully interactive version on our website. The next time someone asks you, “Why trees?” you’ll have some pretty great answers.