1. Another Big Budget Year for Trees!

    by Chuck Mills I recently learned while watching television – the definitive device for expanding one’s education – that three well-respected dictionaries included alternate definitions of the word literally in 2013 that essentially amount to “being taken figuratively.” This is my reason #827 for not having kids: they will speak jibberish if adhering to the likes of Oxford, Cambridge and Merriam-Webster. But I digress. I raise this point to emphasize that when I say California’s urban forest stakeholders literally had no state funding two years ago, I’m going old school on y’all. Not very long ago, CAL FIRE’s Urban and...
  2. Silence Isn’t Golden

    Over the next month, community groups and ReLeaf Network members across California have an opportunity to comment on two important issues. They are the Department of Water Resources’ (DWR) Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (IRWM); and the California Air Resources Board’s (CARB) Urban Forest Project Protocols. To date, these efforts have been fairly non-profitable for urban forestry groups working daily to green our golden state, but with guidance from stakeholders they could prove to be beneficial.   In March, 2014, Governor Brown and the Legislature directed DWR to expedite the solicitation and award of $200 million in IRWM funding to...
  3. Partnering to Protect the Bay Area’s Water

    California ReLeaf recently supported the recruitment and training of two interns for The Watershed Project’s Tree Team Project who will act as Richmond Rain to Roots program ambassadors in Richmond’s Iron Triangle and Sante Fe, two low-income, high-crime neighborhoods in the city.   Training for the interns included 20 hours of basic watershed awareness curriculum that included urban forestry concepts and benefits, climate change topics, storm water pollution and an introduction to green infrastructure solutions. An additional 16 hours was spent training them for the outreach portion of the program. The interns learned how to promote the tree-planting program both...
  4. Fallen Trees Drive Study

    In June, Minnesota was bombarded by storms. High winds and heavy rains meant that there were many felled trees by the end of the month. Now, University of Minnesota researchers are taking a crash course in treefall.   These researchers are scrambling to to document patterns that might reveal why some trees fell and other didn’t. They want to know if urban infrastructure – sidewalks, sewer lines, streets, and other public works projects – has effected the rate at which urban trees fall.   For an in-depth report of how this study will be conducted, you can read an article...
  5. Making Urban Forestry Part of California’s Water Conversation

    Water can be a contentious issue in California’s communities. With resources becoming more limited and restrictions increasing, it’s important to make sure that urban forestry finds it’s place as one of the solutions Californians turn to to solve their water problems. Join us on Wednesday, May 15 from 11:00 a.m.-noon to hear from experts in the field and also hear case studies from an organization that has produced superior water conservation programs.   Speakers: Alf Brandt, Principle Consultant, California State Assembly Edith de Guzman, Research & Analysis Manager, TreePeople Deborah Weinstein, Director of Policy, TreePeople
  6. California Needs Urban Forests

    Ask anyone and they’ll most likely tell you they love trees. California’s cities and towns need trees, but not just to beautify the landscape. Trees do so much more!   Click on the infographic below to visit a fully interactive version on our website. The next time someone asks you, “Why trees?” you’ll have some pretty great answers.  
  7. SF Launches Sidewalk Garden Project

    Project Aims to Reduce Stormwater Impacts and Beautify Neighborhoods   WHO: The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, local non-profit organization Friends of the Urban Forest, community volunteers, with participation by District 5 Supervisor London Breed’s Office.   WHAT: Community volunteers to plant the first block-long sidewalk garden as part of a project to replace thousands of square feet of concrete sidewalk in San Francisco with thriving gardens that capture stormwater and reduce the burden on the City’s combined sewer system. Property owners in specific areas on the East side of the City may be eligible to green their neighborhood block...