1. Urban Forest Resource Roundup: Trees in the News & November Learning Opportunities

    Use AmazonSmile to Support Your City’s Trees While You Shop This Season Help us keep speaking for trees at California’s Capitol! When you shop online this holiday season, use California ReLeaf’s AmazonSmile portal — it’s a little way to make a big difference for California’s trees & communities. Trees in the News Urban trees & public health in The Smithsonian Urban forests author interview in National Geographic City trees saving lives in The Washington Post California trees & drought on NPR Trees & air quality on CityLab USFS and Davey Institute’s Sustainable Urban Forest Guide The FAO’s Guidelines on Urban...
  2. USFS Webinar: Urban Forests for Human Health & Wellness

    Urban Forests for Human Health and Wellness Wednesday, September 10, 2014 | 1:00 – 2:00pm ET People have described the healing power of nature for centuries. This webinar will present current research and best practices showing how outdoor spaces support human health and wellness. Such information can help nature planners and managers engage their community leaders in greening programs, and encourage municipal investments in nearby nature settings to improve human health and well-being. Kathleen Wolf will introduce the latest discourse on human habitat and health, and review health findings that may be of economic value in communities. Teresia Hazen will...
  3. Silence Isn’t Golden

    Over the next month, community groups and ReLeaf Network members across California have an opportunity to comment on two important issues. They are the Department of Water Resources’ (DWR) Integrated Regional Water Management Plan (IRWM); and the California Air Resources Board’s (CARB) Urban Forest Project Protocols. To date, these efforts have been fairly non-profitable for urban forestry groups working daily to green our golden state, but with guidance from stakeholders they could prove to be beneficial.   In March, 2014, Governor Brown and the Legislature directed DWR to expedite the solicitation and award of $200 million in IRWM funding to...
  4. Preserving Trees Through Climate Change

    ASU researchers studying how to preserve tree species amid climate change     TEMPE, Ariz. — Two researchers at Arizona State University are aiming to help officials manage trees based on how different types are affected by climate change.   Janet Franklin, a geography professor, and Pep Serra-Diaz, a postdoctoral researcher, are using computer models to study how quickly a tree species and its habitat will be exposed to climate change. That information is used to locate areas with specific elevations and latitudes where trees could survive and repopulate.   “This is information that would hopefully be useful to foresters,...
  5. Fallen Trees Drive Study

    In June, Minnesota was bombarded by storms. High winds and heavy rains meant that there were many felled trees by the end of the month. Now, University of Minnesota researchers are taking a crash course in treefall.   These researchers are scrambling to to document patterns that might reveal why some trees fell and other didn’t. They want to know if urban infrastructure – sidewalks, sewer lines, streets, and other public works projects – has effected the rate at which urban trees fall.   For an in-depth report of how this study will be conducted, you can read an article...
  6. California’s Urban Forests: Our Front Line Defense Against Climate Change

    President Obama delivered an address on his administration’s plan for combating Climate Change.  His plan calls for a reduction of carbon emissions, increased energy efficiency and climate adaptation planning.  To quote the economy and natural resource section: “America’s ecosystems are critical to our nation’s economy and the lives and health of our citizens. These natural resources can also help ameliorate the impacts of climate change…The Administration is also implementing climate-adaptation strategies that promote resilience in forests and other plant communities…the President is also directing federal agencies to identify and evaluate additional approaches to improve our natural defenses against extreme weather,...
  7. CA Cities Run the Gamut on ParkScore

    Last year, The Trust for Public Land began rating cities throughout the nation by their parks. The index, called ParkScore, ranks the largest 50 cities in the USA based equally on three factors: park access, park size, and services and investments. Seven California cities were included in this year’s index; their rankings, anywhere from third to last, show the disparity of green space among California’s largest cities. Cities with the highest scores can receive a rating of as many as five park benches on a scale of zero to five.   San Francisco – last year’s first place winner –...
  8. Greening Cities Can Support Economic Growth

    The United Nations (UN) has released a report showing that greening city urban infrastructure can sustain economic growth while using fewer natural resources. The report ‘City-Level Decoup-ling: Urban Resource Flows and the Governance of Infrastructure Transitions’ included thirty cases showing the benefits of having gone green. The report was compiled during 2011 by the International Resource Panel (IRP), which is hosted by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP). The findings show that investing in sustainable infrastructures and resource-efficient technologies in cities offers an opportunity to deliver economic growth, with lower rates of environmental degradation, poverty reduction, lower greenhouse-gas emissions and improved...
  9. A Higher Purpose

      A tree can be many things: an air filter, a playground, a shade structure, a landmark. One of the highest purposes a tree can serve, though, is as a memorial.   Recently, through support from California ReLeaf, the Incredible Edible Community Garden (IECG) was able to plant 50 trees with such a purpose.   On March 23, trees were planted at the California State San Bernardino Veteran Success Center to honor and memorialize veterans past, present, and future. The Veteran Success Center provides programs and services that are unique to the needs of service members, including a room where...
  10. Making Urban Forestry Part of California’s Water Conversation

    Water can be a contentious issue in California’s communities. With resources becoming more limited and restrictions increasing, it’s important to make sure that urban forestry finds it’s place as one of the solutions Californians turn to to solve their water problems. Join us on Wednesday, May 15 from 11:00 a.m.-noon to hear from experts in the field and also hear case studies from an organization that has produced superior water conservation programs.   Speakers: Alf Brandt, Principle Consultant, California State Assembly Edith de Guzman, Research & Analysis Manager, TreePeople Deborah Weinstein, Director of Policy, TreePeople