1. Changes to Facebook and YouTube

    If your organization uses Facebook or YouTube to reach the masses, then you should know that change is afoot. In March, Facebook will change all accounts to the new “timeline” profile style. Visitors to your organization’s page will see a whole new look. Make sure you’re ahead of the change by making updates to your page now. You can choose to be an early adopter of the timeline status. If you do that, then you can set up your page and be in charge of how everything looks from the start. Otherwise, you’ll be left changing pictures and items that...
  2. What’s a QR Code?

    You’ve probably seen them before – that little black and white square on a magazine ad that looks vaguely like a barcode. It’s a Quick Response code, usually abbreviated QR code. These codes are matrix barcodes initially used by the automotive industry when shipping cars. Since the invention of the smartphone, QR codes have become popular in everyday life because of their fast readability and large storage capacity. They’re typically used to send a user to a website, deliver a text message, or transfer a phone number. How can QR codes help tree planting organizations? QR codes are easy to...
  3. CSET

    Visalia’s Self-Help Training and Employment Center was almost ten years old when it took on its role as Tulare County’s community action agency in the 1980s. Shortly thereafter, the Tulare County Conservation Corps was started as a program of the organization to serve young people who wanted to continue their education and acquire important job skills. Forty years later, the retitled Community Services and Employment Training (CSET), and its renamed Sequoia Community Corps (SCC) is ramping up their mission of strengthening youth, families, and the surrounding region through a host of social services that include urban forestry. The SCC is...
  4. Common Vision: A Year in the News

    Common Vision, a ReLeaf Network member, travels around California in two vegetable oil-powered buses to teach children about sustainability, environmental stewardship, and fruit trees. They’re also very successful at getting the news to take notice. Take a look at just a few of the stories broadcasted and published about Common Vision in the past year. Taylor Students Plant Fruit Trees Common Vision Plants Fruit Trees Students Get Tree-Planting Lesson We Love Our Trees Common Vision Comes to Chico  
  5. Morton Arboretum Job Opening – Community Trees Advocate

    Community Trees Advocate at The Morton Arboretum:    The Community Trees Advocate (CTA) provides assistance for civic leaders, public officials, arborists, park districts, and community groups who seek to foster healthy and sustainable urban and community forests. The CTA helps these groups improve tree health and management practices to enhance the health, beauty, and livability of their communities by sharing the Arboretum’s knowledge and information resources about the selection, nurture, maintenance, and value of trees.   Job Qualifications: Undergraduate degree in forestry, biology, botany, horticulture, environmental sciences, or related field, and the interest and ability to combine a strong scientific...
  6. Modern-Day Johnny Appleseeds Come to Shasta County

    This September, Common Vision, the traveling tree-planting troupe famous for turning city schoolyards into urban orchards is going rural on a special fall tour that will plant hundreds of fruit trees in Mendocino County, Shasta County, Nevada City, and Chico. Now in its 8th year on the road, Fruit Tree Tour’s veggie oil-powered caravan–the largest known one of its kind–will roll into Shasta County this month carrying 16 Common Vision crew members and hundreds of fruit trees for a day-long orchard planting at Montgomery Creek Elementary on Friday, September 23rd. Students from Indian Springs School in Big Bend will make a field trip to Montgomery Creek to help...
  7. Our City Forest

    Our City Forest is one of 17 organizations statewide selected to receive funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act which is being administered by California ReLeaf. Our City Forest’s mission is to cultivate a green and healthy San José metropolis by engaging community members in the appreciation, protection, growth and maintenance of our urban ecosystem, especially our urban forest. The $750,000 grant to this San Jose-based non-profit will implement the initial phase of Our City Forest’s 100K Trees Project — an initiative to plant 100,000 trees throughout the city. Project work includes galvanizing citywide support, providing urban forestry outreach...
  8. ACT welcomes Carrie Gallagher as new Executive Director

    Carrie Gallagher has been named Executive Director of Alliance for Community Trees (ACT), effective April 4, 2011, announced Ray Tretheway, President of ACT’s Board of Directors. ACT is a national nonprofit dedicated to improving the health and livability of cities by planting and caring for trees. With nearly 200 local affiliates in 41 states, ACT is a national leader in creating greener, cleaner, and healthier communities.  Read more.