1. Nation’s Urban Forests Losing Ground

    National results indicate that tree cover in urban areas of the United States is declining at a rate of about 4 million trees per year, according to a U.S. Forest Service study published recently in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. Tree cover in 17 of the 20 cities analyzed in the study declined while 16 cities saw increases in impervious cover, which includes pavement and rooftops. Land that lost trees was for the most part converted to either grass or ground cover, impervious cover or bare soil. Of the 20 cities analyzed, the greatest percentage of annual loss in tree...
  2. California ReLeaf Speaks For The Trees

    This weekend, thousands of local families will enjoy the new animated movie The Lorax, about the furry Dr. Seuss creature who speaks for the trees.  What they may not realize is that there are real-life Loraxes right here in California. California ReLeaf speaks for the trees every single day.  We are dedicated to providing resources for planting and protecting trees in California—helping to preserve and grow the forest where we live.  California ReLeaf supports a Network of organizations throughout California, all with the common goal of growing great communities by planting and caring for our trees. In the new movie...
  3. Funding Fairs with CFCC

    California’s Financing Coordinating Committee will be holding a series of Funding Fairs across the state this March, April, and May. The full schedule and details are here. Participating agencies include the California Department of Public Health, California Department of Water Resources, California Department of Housing and Community Development, California Infrastructure Bank, State Water Resources Control Board, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Agriculture. For Network members that are positioned to demonstrate their ability to form multi-agency partnerships with local governments and other key entities, these Funding Fairs could provide a tremendous opportunity for organizations...
  4. Forest Service Chief Talks About Meeting Challenges

    USDA Forest Service Chief, Tom Tidwell, recently spoke at the Society of American Foresters annual meeting.  This is what he had to say about urban and community forests: “With over 80 percent of Americans living in metropolitan areas, the Forest Service is expanding our work in places like New York, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles.  America has 100 million acres of urban forests, and through our Urban and Community Forestry program, we are providing assistance to 8,550 communities, home to more than half of our entire population.  Our goal is a continuous network of healthy forested landscapes, from remote wilderness areas...
  5. Vibrant Cities & Urban Forests: A National Call to Action

    In April 2011, the U.S. Forest Service and non-profit New York Restoration Project (NYRP) convened the Vibrant Cities and Urban Forests: A National Call to Action task force outside of Washington, DC. The three-day workshop addressed the future of our nation’s urban forests and ecosystems; incorporating the health, environmental, social and economic benefits they bring to sustainable and vibrant cities. The VCUF task force set out to craft a vision, set of goals and recommendations that will advance urban forestry and natural resources stewardship into the next decade and beyond. The 25 individuals who comprise the task force include the...
  6. U.S. Forest Service Funds Tree Inventory for Urban Planners

    New research funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 will help city planners make better decisions about their urban trees for a range of benefits, including energy savings and improved access to nature. Researchers, led by U.S. Forest Service scientists, will hire field crews to gather information on the condition of forests from approximately 1,000 sites in five western states – Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon and Washington – to compile data for a comparative study on the health of trees in urban areas. The result will be a network of permanently located plots in urbanized areas that...
  7. Our City Forest

    Our City Forest is one of 17 organizations statewide selected to receive funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act which is being administered by California ReLeaf. Our City Forest’s mission is to cultivate a green and healthy San José metropolis by engaging community members in the appreciation, protection, growth and maintenance of our urban ecosystem, especially our urban forest. The $750,000 grant to this San Jose-based non-profit will implement the initial phase of Our City Forest’s 100K Trees Project — an initiative to plant 100,000 trees throughout the city. Project work includes galvanizing citywide support, providing urban forestry outreach...
  8. Can trees make you happy?

    Read this interview from OnEarth Magazine with Dr. Kathleen Wolf, a social scientist at both the University of Washington’s School of Forest Resources and at the U.S. Forest Service, who studies how trees and green spaces can make urban dwellers healthier and happier.  Read the interview here to learn about Dr. Wolf’s fascinating research. Braun, Ashley. “Can A Tree Make You Happy?” OnEarth Magazine 8 March 2011  
  9. New software puts forest ecology in public hands

    The U.S. Forest Service and its partners released this morning the newest version of their free i-Tree software suite, designed to quantify the benefits of trees and assist communities in gaining support and funding for the trees in their parks, schoolyards and neighborhoods. i-Tree v.4, made possible by a public-private partnership, provides urban planners, forest managers, environmental advocates and students is a free tool to measure the ecological and economic value of the trees in their neighborhoods and cities.  The Forest Service and its partners will offer free and easily accessible technical support for the i-Tree suite. “Urban trees are...