1. A Crucial Component

    an interview with Sandra Macias Retired – Urban & Community Forestry Manager, USFS Pacific Southwest Region What is/was your relationship to ReLeaf? From 1999 to 2014, I served as the liaison between California ReLeaf and the US Forest Service. During that time, I advocated for California ReLeaf at the Forest Service level in regards to federal funding and supported education efforts to ReLeaf and the entire Network. What did/does California ReLeaf mean to you? California ReLeaf is a crucial component of a federally mandated State program that requires a support system for nonprofit and community grassroots efforts. It maintains and...
  2. USFS Webinar: Urban Forests for Human Health & Wellness

    Urban Forests for Human Health and Wellness Wednesday, September 10, 2014 | 1:00 – 2:00pm ET People have described the healing power of nature for centuries. This webinar will present current research and best practices showing how outdoor spaces support human health and wellness. Such information can help nature planners and managers engage their community leaders in greening programs, and encourage municipal investments in nearby nature settings to improve human health and well-being. Kathleen Wolf will introduce the latest discourse on human habitat and health, and review health findings that may be of economic value in communities. Teresia Hazen will...
  3. Urban Forestry Makes History

    By Chuck Mills   On June 15, 2014, the Legislature passed a state budget bill that includes $17.8 million for CAL FIRE’s Urban and Community Forestry (U&CF) Program.  Governor Brown is expected to sign this deal.   To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single-state annual appropriation for urban forestry in US History.   More details will follow, but this much is certain: $15.7 million for projects and grants through the U&CF Program, with $2.1 million to support staffing and administration. Per the statutory requirements of Senate Bill 535, the majority of these funds will benefit disadvantaged...
  4. Lessons Learned in Pennsylvania

    By Keith McAleer   It was a pleasure to represent Tree Davis at this year’s Partners in Community Forestry National Conference in Pittsburgh (a big thank you to California ReLeaf for making my attendance possible!).  The annual Partners conference is a unique opportunity for non-profits, arborists, public agencies, scientists and other tree professionals to come together to network, collaborate, and learn about new research and best practices to bring home to help build more nature into our cities.   I had never been to Pittsburgh before, and was delighted by its beautiful fall color, mountains, rivers and rich history.  The...
  5. Injury Symptoms Associated with the Shot Hole Borer

    The polyphagous shot hole borer (SHB), Euwallacea sp., and Fusarium dieback, Fusarium euwallaceae, are a new insect: disease complex causing injury and mortality to numerous native and ornamental hardwood trees and shrubs in southern California. The ambrosia beetle has a wide host range and can complete development in >20 species, including avocado, Persea americana, bigleaf maple, Acer macrophyllum, California box elder, Acer negundo var. californicum, California sycamore, Platanus racemosa, coast live oak, Quercus agrifolia, castorbean, Ricinus communis, red willow, Salix laevigata, and white alder, Alnus rhombifolia.   U.S. Forest Service Region 5 Forest Health Protection recently created a document illustrating...
  6. San Bernardino Youth Renew Parks and Streets

    Southern California Mountains Foundation’s Urban Youth Tree Corp Project, funded through grants made possible by California ReLeaf, CAL FIRE, and the Environmental Protection Agency, was a very successful and effective effort to engage inner city, at-risk youth in urban tree care at the local parks and on the streets. 324 youths were recruited and trained through 32 environmental education, tree care, and urban forestry workshops through the project.   The focal point of the project was tree care and field education and experience for the Urban Conservation Corps (UCC). The Southern California Mountains Foundation provides a workforce development program that...
  7. San Jose’s Trees Boost Economy by $239M Annually

    A recently completed study of San Jose’s urban forest revealed that San Jose is second only to Los Angeles in impervious cover. After mapping San Jose’s trees from the air using lasers, researchers discovered that 58 percent of the city is covered with buildings, asphalt or concrete. And 15.4 percent is covered with trees.   Despite the significant difference in canopy vs. concrete cover, San Jose’s urban forest still manages to boost the city’s economic value by $239 million annually. That’s $5.7 billion over the next 100 years.   Mayor Chuck Reed’s Green Vision plan, meant to plant 100,000 more...
  8. Wood Utilization Options for Insect-Killed Urban Trees

    Washington, DC (February 2013) – The U.S. Forest Service has released a new handbook, “Wood Utilization Options for Urban Trees Infested by Invasive Species,” to provide guidance on best uses and practices for dead and dying urban trees infected by invasive insects in the eastern U.S.   The downloadable publication, developed by the Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory and the University of Minnesota Duluth, offers advice for considering the many available options for using insect-killed wood. This includes a listing of the wide variety of products and markets that are available for this wood, such as lumber, furniture, cabinetry, flooring,...
  9. President Obama, Ever Consider More Trees?

    You would have to live under a rock to not know that President Obama presented his State of the Union address to Congress and the country last night. During his speech, he talked about climate change, its effects on our country, and urged us to take action. He said:     Maybe you’re reading this and wondering, “What does climate change have to do with trees?” Our answer: a lot.   Annually, California’s existing urban forest of 200 million trees sequesters 4.5 million metric tons of greenhouse gases (GHGs) while also displacing an additional 1.8 million metric tons each year....
  10. US Forest Service Report Forecasts Next 50 Years

    WASHINGTON, Dec. 18, 2012 —A comprehensive U.S. Forest Service report released today examines the ways expanding populations, increased urbanization, and changing land-use patterns could profoundly impact natural resources, including water supplies, nationwide during the next 50 years. Significantly, the study shows the potential for significant loss of privately-owned forests to development and fragmentation, which could substantially reduce benefits from forests that the public now enjoys including clean water, wildlife habitat, forest products and others. “We should all be concerned by the projected decline in our nation’s forests and the corresponding loss of the many critical services they provide such as...